Food and energy

 

organic vs. industrial cropped

The challenge of ensuring future food security is compounded by the ecological and resource threats intertwined with that of peak oil; …. climate change, population growth, projected peaks in other fuel sources (e.g., coal, natural gas, uranium), soil depletion and contamination, water shortages, and urbanization. [1]

petrol & food

Petroleum use in the industrial food system before peak oil.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Thinking about oil

slaves 2

Today’s energy supply is equivalent – in energy terms – to 22 billion slaves working around the clock. We’re living with this enormous stock of slaves working for us – in the form of oil – but by the end of this century, there aren’t any more of them.

That’s a huge change we’re facing, it effects just absolutely every aspect of the modern world. [1] Continue reading

Peak oil theory considered

This post begins with history. At *** it start discussion of the likely oil peak in the future.

The peak oil theory holds that any individual oil field (or oil-producing country) will experience a high rate of production growth during initial development, when drills are first inserted into a oil-bearing reservoir.  Later, growth will slow, as the most readily accessible resources have been drained and a greater reliance has to be placed on less productive deposits.  At this point — usually when about half the resources in the reservoir (or country) have been extracted — daily output reaches a maximum, or “peak,” level and then begins to subside.  Of course, the field or fields will continue to produce even after peaking, but ever more effort and expense will be required to extract what remains.  Eventually, the cost of production will exceed the proceeds from sales, and extraction will be terminated. Continue reading

Clean energy vs. oil

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY

 When oil prices fall, low-carbon sources of energy such as wind and solar power may seem less attractive to investors, creating doubts about the pace of the world’s transition to clean energy.

Some renewable energy projects which aren’t completely bedded down are certainly … delayed but at the same time, (the low oil price takes) off the market very expensive oil projects. Tar sands and exploration in the Arctic have become less attractive due to the oil price crash. [1] Continue reading